Dog mess along the trail and river

Dear Dog owners

Please pick up your dogs poo along the trail and Riverbank. I am not sure of the legal position, but allowing your dog to do it's business in the middle of the path is anti social and disgusting . Yes I know other wild animals sometimes do their business along the path, but it's not often that large! 

Special shout out to the man with two large dogs - you know who you are, and your not pleasent! 

From 

A dog owner,  and proud carrier and user of poo bags! 

Comments

  • Does anyone know what happens to all the binfuls of compliant but non-biodegradable plastic bags full of dog poo once the bins are emptied?

    Thanks.
  • they are disposed of with the household waste hence anyone being able to drop a bag into a normal bin, it doesn't have to be a dog bin
  • Thanks Nick. So it goes to landfill and decomposes very slowly, right?
  • When I've seen dog poo bins being emptied all the bags stay in the big plastic bag used to line the bin. Am assuming they'd go to landfill like this.
    I use biodegradable poo bags, but is there any point if they end up being sealed into an ordinary plastic bag?
  • Very good point Theresa. I am surprised at how little interest people take in what happens to waste material once they have delegated responsibility for it.

    I know I am probably in the minority, but I am far more concerned at the environmental effects of dumping plastic than I am with dogs dumping what comes naturally and which biodegrades and becomes harmless in a matter of days.
  • It doesn't really matter where it ends up, if it's on the ground then it biodegrades and feeds the land, if it's in landfill it biodegrades and gets turned into energy. I don't like getting it on my shoes though. It doesn't help concrete to cover it in "fertiliser"
  • Perhaps bagging in a biodegradable bag and flinging it into the undergrowth well away from kids etc, or up a tree is better for the environment. 
  • whilst I sympathise with Theresa'as approach, i wouldn't want to encourage the bag it and hang it brigade.Most domestic landfill sites use vehicles that have large "spuds" (spikes) on their wheels specifically to break up and incorporate rubbish so that anything in a bag is broken out of it  as the poor policemen searching for Corrie McCeague will tell you. I think the plastic ends up as small pieces that become ever smaller  - eventually what will biodegrade, usually does fairly rapidly yielding the usual products of the process.

    The important message is that you should clear up after your dog, and if you see someone that isn't then grab a photo if you can
  • Thanks for this info NickT, will carry on putting the biodegradable bags in the poo bin.
  • Yep, thanks Nick. Maybe the council can source biodegradable liners for the dog poo bins - provided they are emptied often enough...
  • There are certainly many situations where it is best not to bag up dog poo but simply make sure it is out of the way to biodegrade naturally, surely most of the trail and woods should fit this category. 

    Unfortunately, as @Joe points out, there are certain dog owners who are playing by their own set of rules.

    From the BBC website:

    Don't bag up dog poo in countryside', MP urges owners

    "She said the practice of hanging poo-filled bags from trees was "rampant"."

    Not sure that is quite the case in Wivenhoe but I seem to remember it being mentioned (by @Glyn ?)as an issue.

    Also:

    Eight radical solutions to the problem of dog mess



    Obviously it is a slightly different problem when it comes to streets, parks and playgrounds etc., hence the red bins.  Only a shame that a small minority choose not to use them, we do, after all, have to pay for them.

  • I am not an expert in this but I think Natural England is concerned about the effects of "dog fertilizer" on vegetation in sensitive sites.  Some plants only thrive on poor soil so using  biodegradable bags and leaving the poo to rot down may be bad for the environment and alter the plant mix in the area. 
  • edited July 21
    I am not an expert in this but I think Natural England is concerned about the effects of "dog fertilizer" on vegetation in sensitive sites.  Some plants only thrive on poor soil so using  biodegradable bags and leaving the poo to rot down may be bad for the environment and alter the plant mix in the area. 
    Thanks poopdecker, I'm no expert either and must confess hadn't considered any adverse effects with regard to letting dog waste degrade naturally.  I think that the relevant report is the following.

    Dogs, access and nature conservation.

    EN REPORT (SCIE) F&B (3529b) - Natural England publications

    Still feel that allowing dog waste to degrade normally in areas where it is appropriate and bagging & binning elsewhere is the way forward.  That and identifying the tiny minority who are causing the problem.
  • please forgive the flippancy but obviously size does matter!
  • And of course there's the danger of Toxicariasis. See NHS site.
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