Spring arrives in the Wildlife Garden...

Comments

  • What a terrific pic
  • Wonder how you got that Chris, careful observation, patience and a long lens ? There are quite a few of us on here who would very much appreciate some pointers
  • NickT said:
    Wonder how you got that Chris, careful observation, patience and a long lens ? There are quite a few of us on here who would very much appreciate some pointers

    Sit by the pond, making sure the light is right (ie not looking straight into it), but having disturbed them by walking round to the seat, then wait. Usually after 5-10 mins they usually reappear from the depths, if you remain still, and restart their activities. They are mostly males (hear then calling!) waiting around for a gravid female to arrive. At which point it can all get a bit messy!

    Like Glyn and his bird photos, I use a superzoom bridge camera Canon Powershot SX60 - has a fantastic zoom capability, which although not of the quality of a DSLR is fine for most purposes, and is a very portable piece of kit.

    Main thing is that with a portable camera like that, to take it out at every opportunity, and then when you are in the right place at the right time, you will have the means to capture the moment.
  • I agree with Chris on his last point. My camera never leaves my side so I am often in the right place at the right time...

    Wonderful shots, Chris!

    Thanks for sharing.
  • Great shots! 
  • Great to see - thanks for posting.
  • Thanks Chris, aside from having visions of the pond now being surrounded by the local equivalent of the papparazi, it would be fun to have a go. Planning to use a Canon 700 and a 70mm - 300mm - overkill for the job ?
  • Thanks all for kind comments.
    NickT said:
    Thanks Chris, aside from having visions of the pond now being surrounded by the local equivalent of the papparazi, it would be fun to have a go. Planning to use a Canon 700 and a 70mm - 300mm - overkill for the job ?

    Nick, that kit should be fine. Try and choose a warm day, as they are more active then, and certainly more vocal - your challenge is to snap one with vocal sacs inflated! But do bear in mind that active froggery is very time-limited: once the local females are spent (and that could be in next week or so), any frogs remaining in the pond tend to remain submerged for more of the time.

    If you do get good results, Wivenhoe Watching Wildlife is hoping to run a photo competition this summer, so please bear that in mind. More details about that during the May wildlife week.
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