Traffic impact

Inevitably there is increasing traffic in Wivenhoe and with the new building at Cooks Shipyard it will be further increased. Are there any suggestions on how we - as residents and businesses - can minimise the problems around this? 
So far, I've thought of the following:
- for supermarket deliveries always choose a time-slot that other people are using
- for couriers, try to use central pick up places, like the newsagent (I'm looking into this)
- when ordering deliveries or collections that might involve substantial size lorries, recommend routes that avoid single lane roads, or warn the company of narrow roads and limited access (in the hope they use a smaller lorry).



Comments

  • It would be allot easier if Queen's Road was reopened.  This was the way the majority of large vehicles got to lower Wivenhoe in the past.
  • The usual is happening ... old narrow streets,16th and 17th century houses, a conservation area ... gradually pulverised into rubble as they become thoroughfares to new estates. Old making way for the new. Onward we go. 
  • Having driven large vans and towed trailers around Wivenhoe, it was alot easier when Queens Rd was open. The corners on the alternative routes through Park/Valley Rd or East St are a nightmare to negotiate especially when you meet someone who wont reverse.

    Who do we ask to get the closure reconsidered, Essex CC or Colchester BC? Would writting to the MP help?
  • Having driven large vans and towed trailers around Wivenhoe, it was alot easier when Queens Rd was open. The corners on the alternative routes through Park/Valley Rd or East St are a nightmare to negotiate especially when you meet someone who wont reverse.

    Who do we ask to get the closure reconsidered, Essex CC or Colchester BC? Would writting to the MP help?
    I would imagine Essex CC highways were responsible.  I cannot understand the logic behind the closure, it only benifits around 20 households at the cost of all lower Wivenhoe and Dene Park.
  • edited September 2016
    Brook Street, Anglesea Road and East Street will have more traffic if the Chinese takeaway gets planning permission on Wivenhoe Business Centre. Unlike the Pizzeria, the Chinese is a takeaway service :(

  • The pizza place did takeaway as well - we always collected from there (although we were on foot, but that's not the point).

    Most of their orders will go out for delivery - just like the Pizza place. The only way there would be an increase in traffic over that which the pizza place generated would be if the Chinese was more successful.

    Stifling enterprise doesn't seem like a particularly smart move given the level of moaning we have on here about becoming a 'dormitory town' and the general predicament the country is in at the moment. Glad to see Cyril Liddy is fully behind the local economy.......

  • Why not make The Avenue a 20mph limit and narrow the pavemnt by half a metre on the opposite side of the Coop all the way up as far as possible. 
    Put Bollards in at the edge to stop vehicles crossing onto the pavement, so making pedestrians still feel safe.
    There would be plenty of of room then for parked cars and two way traffic. 
    Got to be cheaper than the cycleway to uni and of more benefit to more people.
  • One way system? 
    By far the best option. But what about picking up your partner from the Station when you haven't got a minute to live?
  • Open Queens Road and surface Anglesea Road - a sensible route to the shipyard area would be a major improvement. 
  • DeborahT said:
    That side needs a new road I guess. That seems unrealistic though. Is there a need for a transport strategy in Wivenhoe, organised through the WTC? I'm sure there must be some experts lurking about (I dabble in research about transport and at a push could do more, but I'm not a Tony Travers).

    I have noticed a lot of speeding...wouldn't it be great to have a 20m speed limit in the town, with traffic calming measures? Would encourage more cycling...
    Why not go along to the next town council meeting and have this matter raised 
  • Transport issues were considered at great length during the development of the Neighbourhood Plan. However in simple terms monies from new development can only be used to mitigate the impact of those developments and cannot be used to solve existing problems. They can however be used to connect any new developments with the existing town by the provision of additional footpaths and cycle ways.

    One way systems, adoption of Anglesea Road and other suggestion made during the process are very difficult to bring forward in the current planning framework even if there was a real willingness from the populace for them to be taken forward and the funds to do so. 

    The new 'Garden Suburb' presents a whole new raft of issues for Wivenhoe, not least how to manage traffic and movement around the town and wider area, the convenience of the station may well generate more traffic and even with some additional parking, wider restrictions on the surrounding residential streets may be necessary. 

    In respect of deliveries I wonder if some sort of hub and spoke operation may possible, with a community service (using electric vehicles perhaps) from the top of the town might be feasible, but factors such as insurance, liabilities and returns would all have to be looked at. 
  • "They can however be used to connect any new developments with the existing town by the provision of additional footpaths and cycle ways."

    It seems to me that all the money readily spent to build the new cycle/footpath/road out of Wivenhoe towards the new "Garden City" to the north was really spent to facilitate the usage of wivenhoe's facilities by all these new residents.

  • Get used to it, I say. We've created a car nation.

    If we'd carried on shopping locally, supporting our local businesses there would be less need to drive to town and no need at all for the daily fleet of food delivery vans. There would also be more jobs in Wivenhoe negating the need for commuting. 

    We get the world we deserve, carmageddon it must be. 
  • Mike, if everyone shopped locally, you'd need a massive daily fleet of delivery vans to keep the shops stocked.
  • No, not really. Not everything grows in a big distribution centre next to the M25. I understand that some edible things can be found in those green things that currently surround Wivenhoe
  • Mike said:
    No, not really. Not everything grows in a big distribution centre next to the M25. I understand that some edible things can be found in those green things that currently surround Wivenhoe


    But then not everything grows in those 'green things' either. Smaller local shops will die out due to the convencience of the likes of Tesco by the university. Tesco can supply pretty much all your needs in one visit rather than having to go to multiple local shops.

    Don't get me wrong here, supporting the local economy is a great idea but not many people have the time to go to all the little shops to get things, it just isn't a sustainable idea in the long term.


  • Mike said:
    Get used to it, I say. We've created a car nation.

    If we'd carried on shopping locally, supporting our local businesses there would be less need to drive to town and no need at all for the daily fleet of food delivery vans. There would also be more jobs in Wivenhoe negating the need for commuting. 

    We get the world we deserve, carmageddon it must be. 
    If the local businesses that have closed down had adapted to the changing face of retail they might still be trading. 

    I don't think it is fair to lay 100% of the blame at the feet (or should that be car) of the consumer.

  • We've been here before but I recommend reading George Monbiot's Captive State to get an idea of how unfairly Supermarkets have acted.

    To suggest that small businesses have failed because they didn't try hard enough is somewhat simplistic.
  • Mike said:
    We've been here before but I recommend reading George Monbiot's Captive State to get an idea of how unfairly Supermarkets have acted.

    To suggest that small businesses have failed because they didn't try hard enough is somewhat simplistic.
    yes i know we have been here before, which is why i said "[not] fair to lay 100% of the blame" on consumers. 

    Reducing this to the absurd - you wouldn't repeatedly buy an item from a shop that was twice the price of the same item in another shop would you?

    When you say 'how unfairly supermarkets have acted' this makes it sound like you think they should deliberately encumber themselves in some way - that doesn't make any sense why would anyone do that?

    By the way i'm not saying this is a good state of affairs, but if you want to affect change that results in lower traffic levels - the business community has its part to play as well.
  • To answer your question, if it was urgent and I've boycotted one of the shops then, yes, I would pay twice the price. 


  • When people need couriers/deliveries at the bottom of the town, if possible please could they avoid using giant Tuffnell-sized lorries. Giant Tuffnell-sized lorries cause blockages and are dangerous because they're too big for the narrow roads. Generally, small is best in a place with single track streets without footpaths.
  • How often are you advised what size delivery lorry they company will use, particularly when they out-source.  You can advise local stores, but difficult with on-line purchases.
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